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Plane Dining Table, Rectangular, Umber Stained Oak

by Jamie McLellan
$9,950

Estimated Ship Date On or Before 05/23

Overview

The Plane Dining Table was designed by Jamie McLellan for Resident. Pure and poised, the Plane Table stacks hefty slabs of timber in a seemingly impossible balancing act.
Clever engineering holds the legs, cross beam and table top together in an altar-like assembly that is both useable and sculptural.
Made from solid oak, the Plane Table is available in Natural oak or Umber stained oak.

Established in 2011 by Simon James and Scott Bridgens, Resident is a globally focused design company. Resident's mission is to offer products with an unparalleled level of creativity and innovation.

Plane Table, Rectangular, Solid Oak, Umber Stained Oak by Jamie McLellan for Resident
- Modern design
- Solid Oak FSC certified
- H 29.5" x W 94.5" x D 39.3"
- Appropriate for hard contract use
- Indoor use only
- 3 years warranty
- Made in Lithuania

Contact us for made to measure options:
Length increments
59.1”- 63.0” - 66.9” - 70.9” - 74.8” - 78.7” - 82.7” - 86.6” - 90.6” - 94.5” - 98.4” - 102.4” - 106.3” - 110.2”
Width options
35.4” - 39.4”


Specifications

SHIPPING DIMENSIONS
2 boxes 98.4"x43.3"x4.7” + 70.9"x37.8"x6.3”
Weight
286 lbs
MADE IN
Lithuania
DIMENSIONS
L 94.5" W 39.3" H 29.5"

Designer

Jamie McLellan
Jamie McLellan

Jamie McLellan is Head of Design for Allbirds in San Francisco. The early part of Jamie’s design career was spent working in Italy, Hong Kong and Hawaii, before eventually ending up in London working closely with internationally acclaimed designer Tom Dixon. Jamie then returned home to set up his own product and furniture design consultancy based in Auckland, New Zealand. His clients included established global brands such as Cathay Pacific, Neil Pryde and Tom Dixon, along with innovative start-ups like Bodha, Resident, and Allbirds, which he ultimately joined as the brand’s first Head of Design. The objects Jamie has designed are wide ranging - from lighting to luxury watercraft, olympic bicycles to beer taps, furniture to woolen footwear. Often celebrating the engineering within, these designs can all be described as minimal with a singular maximal twist, or in Jamie’s words “just the right amount of nothing”.